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Pilocarpine...Dealing With Side Effects?

Pilocarpine...Dealing With Side Effects?

Recently (August 201i), was treated for, what they thought was a salivary gland infection. After 2 rounds of antibiotics, issues were still there along with oral thrush. Suspected Sjogrens is now diagnosis. Started Pilocarpine, 10mg 3 times daily. Although I do like having saliva again, the flushing side effect is making it difficult. I no longer can feel any cold in ambient temperature. It's now December and I sleep with window open and an additional air… read more

A MyChronicPainTeam Member said:

Yes....I am aware of all of this. I research each medication before I take it. I am looking for other ideas in fighting the side effects. I am on clonidine to help with flushing. I'm not thrilled to have to take an additional medication to fight side effects of another. There are few medications available for Sjogrens symptoms. My ENT had a great idea for reducing the pain from my tongue. Unfortunately it is a benzo and can no longer use due to pain contract. It was the only thing that has worked so now back to painful tongue, cracks and sores that do not heal and damage to teeth and gums due to dryness. I've had to cut back pilocarpine to only 2 doses of 5mg a day and just dealing with symptomology. It's a drag!

posted 7 months ago
A MyChronicPainTeam Member said:

To help your doctor and pharmacist give you the best care, be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products) before starting treatment with this product. While using this product, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any other medicines you are using without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include beta-blockers (such as propranolol, metoprolol).

Pilocarpine may cause drugs with "drying" effects (some antihistamines, anticholinergics such as certain drugs for asthma, overactive bladder, and Parkinson's) to work less well. Examples of affected drugs include chlorpheniramine, diphenhydramine, atropine, belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, ipratropium, and tolterodine. These medications can also worsen dry mouth, causing pilocarpine to work less well. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Check the labels on all your medicines (such as cough-and-cold products) because they may contain ingredients that could have a drying effect. Ask your pharmacist for more details.

To help your doctor and pharmacist give you the best care, be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products) before starting treatment with this product. While using this product, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any other medicines you are using without your doctor's approval.

posted 7 months ago
A MyChronicPainTeam Member said:

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: breathing problems (such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-COPD), certain eye conditions (such as night blindness, acute iritis, narrow-angle glaucoma), heart disease (such as chest pain, heart failure, heart attack, slow heartbeat), low or high blood pressure, liver problems, gallbladder disease (such as gallstones), kidney stones, mental/mood disorders (such as depression, psychoses, thinking/understanding problems like dementia, Alzheimer's), stomach problems (such as chronic heartburn, ulcer).

This drug may make you dizzy or cause vision problems, especially at night. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you dizzier. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness or clear vision, especially at night, until you can do it safely. Limit alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

If pilocarpine makes you sweat heavily, drink plenty of fluids so that you do not become dehydrated. If you are unable to drink enough fluids, talk with your doctor right away.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

Caution is advised when using this drug in the elderly because they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially dizziness, diarrhea, and increased urge to urinate.

posted 7 months ago
A MyChronicPainTeam Member said:

Pilocarpine is a medication used to reduce pressure inside the eye and treat dry mouth. As eye drops it is used to manage angle closure glaucoma until surgery can be performed, ocular hypertension, primary open-angle glaucoma, and to bring about constriction of the pupil following its dilation.

This medication is used to treat symptoms of dry mouth due to a certain immune disease (Sjogren's syndrome) or from saliva gland damage due to radiation treatments of the head/neck for cancer. Pilocarpine belongs to a class of drugs known as cholinergic agonists. It works by stimulating certain nerves to increase the amount of saliva you produce, making it easier and more comfortable to speak and swallow.

How to use Pilocarpine Hcl
Take this medication by mouth with or without food, usually 3-4 times daily, or as directed by your doctor.

To reduce your risk of side effects, your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully.

Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. If you have liver problems, your doctor may direct you to start taking this drug only twice daily. The usual maximum adult dose is 30 milligrams each day.

Take this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day.

You may continue to drink water or use saliva substitutes as needed for moisture in your mouth.

You may start to feel some benefit in 1 to 2 weeks. However, it may take up to 3 months to feel the full benefit. Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

Sweating, nausea, runny nose, chills, flushing, frequent urge to urinate, dizziness, weakness, diarrhea, and blurred vision may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

This medication may cause an increase in tears. This can be helpful if you have dry eyes (such as with Sjogren's syndrome). Tell your doctor if runny eyes become a problem.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: slow/fast heartbeat, shakiness (tremor), fainting, lung problems (such as increased wheezing/cough/phlegm), mental/mood changes (such as confusion, agitation), severe stomach/abdominal pain.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

posted 7 months ago
A MyChronicPainTeam Member said:

@A MyChronicPainTeam Member Regarding your problems with dry mouth, I've been having similar problems like you describe and wonder whether you also experience these symptoms: dry throat, dry mouth, excessive sweating, an become easily over-heated. My Dentist is very concerned and said that I instead of sipping water all day, that I should drink at least 1/4 cup of water at a time and often. So far I've put it down to a side effect of Oxycodone although I haven't yet confirmed this with my doctor. Do you still experience this problem?

posted about 1 year ago
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